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INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR THE MEDITERRANEAN 

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Founded by three historic yacht clubs, the Yacht Club de France, the Yacht Club Italiano and the Real Club Náutico de Barcelona, which now total more than 400 years of existence, the International Committee of the Mediterranean was founded in 1926 , but his authority and skill have never been more useful than they are today, with the growing complexity of classic yachting events.

In the twenties of the last century, the great open-sea regattas criss-crossed the western Mediterranean during the summer, punctuated by sumptuous parties at the start, stopovers and arrivals. In view of their number and the quality of their attendance, the need for a common authority was imposed, which began to organize new regattas, the first in 1927 and in 1928 were won by Moonbeam III, which was then called Eblis and which thus became the first winner of the CIM races.

 

After an interruption, from 1939 to 1948, the high seas regattas reappeared with great success and with strong French, Italian and Spanish participation. Therefore, in 1950, the organizers decided to "resuscitate" the CIM and at the meeting of January 15, 1951, held in Paris, in addition to the representatives of the three founding yacht clubs, those of the Spanish, French and Italian.

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Two very active yacht clubs were soon co-opted by the founders: the Yacht Club de Monaco (founded in 1953) and the Royal Malta Yacht Club (founded in 1835). From 1978, the CIM therefore consisted of five clubs, officially united in the Protocol of Monaco of February 8, 1979. The Société Nautique de Genève and the Hellenic Offshore Racing Club were successively added, but ten years ago the Royal Malta Yacht Club and the Société Nautique de Genève have withdrawn.

In the sixties, the CIM intervened, alongside the RORC, to contribute to the introduction of the IOR (International Offshore Rule) and more recently created its own Rules of Gauge which govern the regattas of vintage and classic yachts in the Mediterranean, but also in Argentina.

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Today, the CIM, which deals exclusively with traditional boats, is made up of five yacht clubs (Yacht Club de France, Yacht Club de Monaco, Yacht Club Italiano, Real Club Náutico de Barcelona and Hellenic Offshore Raging Club). , four associations of vintage and classic yacht owners, AFYT (France), AIVE (Italy), AMBC (Monaco) and RANC (Spain) and five sailing federations (Spain, France, Greece, Italy, Monaco) which undertake to enforce the rules of the CIM in their countries.

It is the combination of all these skills that produces in the Mediterranean a classic yachting of a quality envied throughout the world.

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